TechVision Aids Blind and Visually Impaired/Sighted Individuals

Every now and then I discover a resource that I wonder why I didn’t already know about it.  A recent discovery is TechVision http://www.yourtechvision.com/.

TechVision

Denise M. Robinson, TVI, PhD a teacher of the blind and visually impaired,  founded TechVision to write lessons for teachers, parents and students themselves to enhance their learning through emerging technology. Dr. Robinson can be reached through the contact page and will answer questions. It is also possible to request a specific lesson via the contact page.

Lessons Available for Many Programs and Tools

Although the easy to follow lessons must be purchased, lessons are available to  help  the  blind, the visually impaired and anyone with a reading difficulties learn how to use the Internet, Facebook, Skype, Office Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Mac/iTools,  Blind tools and more.  Prices vary. There are a few lessons that are free or under $1.00 while others are under $10.00 and some are $50-$60.

What Really Caught my Attention

What really caught my attention however, was not the lessons, but the tips and ideas that are available in the blog post  on the Home page.  I found the post, The List of Chat Acronyms & Text Message Shorthand of interest because I’ve recently had to learn how to us the text message feature on my (very basic) phone.  The list provides lots of acronyms and text message shorthand, so it takes  just a fraction of time to text a message.

The most recent post is a video explaining how to use the  scientific calculator on your PC using talking software.

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About WINAHEAD

WINAHEAD is made up of representatives from twenty-nine institutions. Our members are professionals employed by two- and four-year colleges and universities who work directly with students with disabilities to ensure equal access to higher education. WIN indicates the geographic area we represent: Western Iowa and Nebraska. AHEAD is our national parent organization, the Association on Higher Education and Disability.
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